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Double Duty

Edit your makeup arsenal with multipurpose cosmetics.


By Anna Gamboa Gan

JULY 2012


Too many cosmetics, too little space in your purse. That’s the dilemma of most women who carry tiny handbags that can only accommodate a tube of lipstick, a mobile phone and a tiny coin purse. One solution: get more than one use out of your maquillage.

 

But is getting more than one use out of your eye shadow or lipstick okay? For this, we polled various experts from the beauty industry: Criscy Camacho and Fatima Lopez of Mary Kay Philippines; Jin Lee of Amore Pacific Corp., which distributes Laneige; AVON’s Mar Ann Barsabal-Soliven; and Maybelline’s Archie Tolentino.

 

Vice-versa

Asked about using lipstick as blusher in a pinch, Barsabal-Soliven, Lee and Tolentino were in agreement about its possibilities in a beauty emergency, although the latter warned to veer away from some colors that are too bright to be used as blushers. Lee, the head of Amore’s international training division, opines, “Red- or orange-colored lipstick may add vitality, but for [a] natural, long lasting effect, I still highly recommend blusher.” Camacho, a marketing director, firmly states, “I wouldn’t recommend [it] because the finish of a lipstick is quite thick and sticky to be put on the face. It could be the source of a skin concern [or] irritation later on.” Her suggestions: pinch your cheeks for a natural glow, or use a subdued pink or coral eye shadow to double up as cheek color.

 

The experts were evenly divided when it came to the use of eyeliners as eyebrow pencils, or vice versa. Generally, those who were against eyeliners as eyebrow definers cited the fact that eyeliners are often darker than eyebrow pencils and there’s risk of depositing too much color on the brows. Lopez discourages the use of eyebrow pencils for lining the eyes, but sees no harm in using eyeliner for brow definition, provided one uses light strokes and an angled brush. Barsabal-Soliven thinks it’s permissible to use an eyeliner for the brows, as long as the shade is a light or dark brown for Pinays, and the eyebrow pencil is sharpened before using it as an eyeliner, it’ll make for “[an] easier and cleaner application.”

 

When it came to using wet or dry eye shadow as an eyeliner or brow definer, makeup artist Tolentino champions its use, but with a caveat: “[When] using it as a brow definer, carefully choose the right color. Gray-browns are best for those with dark brown hair, while red-browns are best for those with reddish-toned hair color. He recommends buying chubby eye pencils that can double as eyeshadow and eyeliner, and the use of Maybelline’s Eyestudio Lasting Drama Gel Liners, which double as the creamy base on the eyelids to create smoky-eyed looks. 

Lee gives these tips, “You can use brown colored eye shadow as [a] brow definer, but in this case, it’s better to use [it] with an eyebrow brush for natural expression. Eye shadow may be used as eyeliner, but [remember] to match it with the base color.” Barsabal-Soliven’s recommended tool for this application is a pointed sponge. Camacho recommends an altogether different product that can do double duty: “We have the bronzing powder, in Desert Sun shade, that gives your face a sun-kissed glow and the highlighting powder, in Pink Stardust, that illuminates the skin with a hint of shimmer. Both of these powders can also be used as eye shadows. Dot a small portion of the white powder in Pink Stardust to the inner corner of your eyes to add a bit of sexiness to it.”


For more tips on the wonders of double duty and short-cut makeup, get a copy of the July issue of HealthToday, out now in bookstores and newsstands.







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